Mural Monday – Trochu (2)

Trochu artist Eldon Walls is the painter of four more murals that I photographed on our visit to the town in August.

B. G. Mathieu built his electronics shop on this site in 1949 and did business until 1974.

B. G. Mathieu's electronics shop by Eldon Walls -  Trochu, Alberta Mural

B. G. Mathieu’s electronics shop by Eldon Walls – Trochu, Alberta Mural (Photo © 2013 by V. Nesdoly)

Nuns of St. Mary’s. Caring for our community since 1911.

Nuns of St. Mary's by Eldon Walls - Trochu, Alberta Mural

Nuns of St. Mary’s by Eldon Walls – Trochu, Alberta Mural (Photo © 2013 by V. Nesdoly)

Harvesting − a horse-drawn binder cuts the grain and ties it into sheaves.

Harvest  with a horse-drawn binder by Eldon Walls - Trochu, Alberta Mural

Harvest with a horse-drawn binder by Eldon Walls – Trochu, Alberta Mural (Photo © 2013 by V. Nesdoly)

More harvest scenes.

Top: a threshing machine extracts the grain from the harvested grain. It blows the chaff onto a straw pile while a truck receives the grain kernels.
Bottom:  More horse-drawn binders. The man in the foreground stacks the sheaves in a pyramid shape (called stooks) so they will dry.

More  harvest scenes by Eldon Walls - Trochu, Alberta Mural

More harvest scenes by Eldon Walls – Trochu, Alberta Mural (Photo © 2013 by V. Nesdoly)

 

These paintings add a lot to a small town and take us back to a simpler, slower time!

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Mural Monday – Trochu (2)

  1. Right near my childhood home, we had a grain elevator that looked just like the ones on the Rexall drugs mural. I’m sure that if I did a historical research, I would discover that the place where my house (built in the 1930’s) sat would have been right about in the middle of that field in the mural, in the days when the field was harvested with a horse-drawn binder. There were houses all around when I was a child, but there was still a 10-acre field in the middle of the block. The mural helps me imagine that place before the houses, when the grain elevator would have stood at the edge of the town.

    Like

      • It was actually just at the edge of the prairie, in the U.S. in southern Minnesota, where Laura Ingalls Big Woods begins to turn into prairie. But by the time I was “growing up” in the 1960’s, that prairie was smack dab in the middle of a small city. Thanks to the mural, I can now imagine what it looked like when my grandparents were hauling their grain by horse and buggy, from the farm to the feed mill.

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: